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When we talk about major concerns facing LGBTQ youth, we typically discuss topics like bias-based bullying and harassment or familial rejection and homelessness; and when we talk about violence facing the larger LGBTQ community, we typically discuss hate crimes.

In other words, we talk about the violence facing our community from those outside it, from those who are openly homophobic and transphobic, but what about the violence happening within our community?

While we certainly need more research into the reasons for these disparities, it is worth noting that existing curricula on teen dating violence and related topics like sex education or domestic or sexual violence prevention education are rarely inclusive of LGBTQ youth. This lack of inclusiveness allows for the persistence of myths that, for example, men cannot be victims of intimate partner violence, or that women cannot be violent to their partners.While 29 percent of heterosexual youth surveyed reported being physically abused by dating partners, for example, 42.8 percent of LGB youth reported the same.The rates of sexual victimization for LGB respondents was 23.2 percent, nearly double that of heterosexual youth, of whom 12.3 percent reported sexual coercion.Examples thereof are name-calling, bullying, teasing or isolation from family and friends - Sexual - when a partner is forced to engage in a sexual act Technological advances have become tools used to intimidate and emotionally abuse teenagers.Digital harassment by cell phone and internet is rife amongst teenagers.

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