Statistics for teenage dating

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In a Liz Claiborne Survey released in March 2006, half (50%) of the 1,004 teens ages 13 to 18 surveyed reported they've been in a dating relationship and nearly a third (32%) said they've been in a serious relationship.

This same survey found that: According to a February 2005 Lifetime Television survey of 600 women and men, ages 16-24, intimate partner violence has personally touched their lives much more so than people have reported in prior studies: Approximately seven in ten women (77%) and men (64%) said they know or have known someone in an abusive relationship and approximately six in ten say that they know a woman who has been sexually assaulted.

Among teens who have had relationships, talking on the phone (39%) ranks second for everyday interactions, followed by instant messaging (29%), being together in person (21%), social media (21%) and messaging apps (20%).

Fewer teen daters interact daily with their romantic partner by video chatting, emailing or playing video games.

Technology can make teens feel more connected and closer to their partner; it can also cause feelings of jealousy and uncertainty.

Fully 59% of teens with relationship experience say social media makes them feel more connected to what’s happening in their romantic partner’s life, and 44% report that social media makes them feel emotionally closer to their significant other.

Teens often take steps to sever digital ties with their ex-partner after break-ups.

Half (48%) of teen daters have deleted an ex-partner from their cellphone’s address book and 38% have untagged or deleted photos of themselves and a former significant other on social media, while a similar share (37%) have unfriended or blocked an ex on social media.

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While there are no gender differences when it comes to removing an ex from their phone contact list or blocking a former partner from texting them, teen girls with relationship experience (44%) are more likely than their male counterparts (31%) to block or unfriend an ex on social media.

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Significant numbers of teens (15-18) are experiencing emotional and mental abuse as well as violence in their dating relationships; this is even more prevalent among teens that have had sex by the age of 14. commissioned Teenage Research Unlimited (TRU) to conduct quantitative research among tweens (ages 11-14), parents of tweens, and teens (ages 15-18) who have been in a relationship.

The research pertained to young dating relationships and the presence/absence of sexual activity and abusive behaviors.

TRU independently sampled the three groups and fielded a customized 15-minute survey online to each group from January 2-18, 2008; TRU chose online as the data-collection method for this research not only because of its high penetration (92%) among this population, but also because of the sensitive nature of the content, allowing young people to answer candidly (i.e., no adult interviewer) within the context of their preferred communications method.

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